Tag Archives: deflation

Risk Behind Buffett…

By Biiwii

Thanks to reader Mary, an excellent article at Forbes by John Tobey…

The Risk Behind Buffett’s Advice

I found it interesting for several reasons.  One is the use of log scale charts and their value in viewing percentage based prices over very long (a Century in this case) periods.  I use mostly linear charts because I usually deal in 1 week to 10 year time frames.  But Mr. Tobey’s assertion that long-term investors should be interested in percentage performance is a good one.

Secondly, adjustments are made to the market (in this case, the Dow) for ‘inflation’ and ‘deflation’ using the CPI as the denominator.  CPI is noisy (e.g. faulty) on shorter time frames (it is not inflation, it is inflation’s effects), but over a century it is what it is after inflation and deflation have long since shaken out into the picture.

Here is his chart of the adjusted Dow.  But read the article.  It’s quick and to the point.

dow.cpi

Europe Fights Lower Prices

By Biiwii

The European inflation rate is “calculated using the weighted average of the Harmonised Index of Consumer Price [HICP] aggregates” according to TradingEconomics.com.  That is a fancy way of saying the things people pay for, including the things they need on a daily basis.

Here is the dreaded deflation (of consumer prices) that Europe is fighting.  Like the US before it, Europe is operating on a plan that would boost prices (i.e. the effects of inflation) higher so that people participating in the financialized economy can benefit from rising equities (as we first projected in Q4 2014) and the regular people can, well… get screwed (USA style).

euro.inflation

Welcome to the European ‘me too’ QE play!

Yesterday the Euro boinked our target of 105 [1.04935] and all seems to be going according to plan.

euro

But the play (dollar bull, euro bear) is getting extreme now.  Extremes can persist but they are what they are, defined as “reaching a high or the highest degree; very great”.

Let’s just assume the extremes have not yet reached the highest degree.  That does not mean the risk vs. reward to a stance in line with current trends is not extreme.  It is.  Time is the thing.  Trend followers who momo mature trends and go on autopilot always get burned sooner or later.

The ‘Good’ Deflation Argument

By Elliott Wave International

Here’s What’s Wrong with the ‘Good’ Deflation Argument

Editor’s note: This article was adapted, with permission, from the February issue of The Elliott Wave Financial Forecast, a publication of Elliott Wave International, the world’s largest market forecasting firm. All data is as of Jan. 30, 2015. Click here to read the complete version of this article, including specific near-term forecasts, 100% free.

Deflation is a decline in the supply of money and credit relative to goods and services in an economy.

History shows us that the most important deflationary episodes are invariably accompanied by comparable declines in equity, factory and retail prices.

Continue reading The ‘Good’ Deflation Argument

Deflation

We have deflation of footballs and deflation of my lungs after round 1 out there in the driveway.  Back in and taking a break, I always find Jeff Gundlach an interesting listen.  Maybe you will too… Pardon the ad if one pops up in the 1st 30 seconds.

Around the Web

  • Would a Gold Standard Brighten Economic Outcomes?  –Big Picture  [biiwii comment: the old argument… the author’s conclusion is laughable as practically applied by today’s CB’s (“a gold standard is not needed to preserve price stability as long as a country’s central bank is independent and has a clear mandate to achieve price stability), but a gold standard for a modern financial and economic system is not the answer; discipline and transparency are the answers in large part imo; esp. discipline, which is lacking world-wide]

 

Money, Commodities, Balls and How Much Deflation is Enough?

Guest Post by Michael Ashton

Money: How Much Deflation is Enough?

Once again, we see that the cure for all of the world’s ills is quantitative easing. Since there is apparently no downside to QE, it is a shame that we didn’t figure this out earlier. The S&P could have been at 200,000, rather than just 2,000, if only governments and central banks had figured out a century ago that running large deficits, combined with having a central bank purchase large amounts of that debt in the open market, was the key to rallying assets without limit.

That paragraph is obviously tongue-in-cheek, but on a narrow time-scale it really looks like it is true. The Fed pursued quantitative easing with no yet-obvious downside, and stocks blasted off to heights rarely seen before; the Bank of Japan’s QE has added 94% to the Nikkei in the slightly more than two years since Abe was elected; and today’s announcement by the ECB of a full-scale QE program boosted share values by 1-2% from Europe to the United States.

Continue reading Money, Commodities, Balls and How Much Deflation is Enough?

Debt and Deflation: 3 Financial Forecasts

Guest Post by Elliott Wave International

Debt and Deflation: Three Financial Forecasts

There’s more to deflation than falling prices

Editor’s note: You’ll find the text version of the story below the video. Join Elliott Wave International’s free State of the U.S. Markets online conference to get prepared for the major moves in U.S. stocks, commodities, gold, USD and more for 2015 and beyond. Register now and get instant access to a free video presentation from market legend Robert Prechter and regular email updates with insights from our most recent publications and presentations from our key analysts.

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Inflation ruled from 1933 to 2008.

Yet in the just-published Elliott Wave Theorist, Bob Prechter’s headline says, “Deflation is Starting to Win.”

Take a look at this chart from The Telegraph:

Continue reading Debt and Deflation: 3 Financial Forecasts

Around the Web

  • Stocks Rise as on China Growth, ECB Bets as Dollar Rises  –Bloomberg  [biiwii comment: surprised? anyone? the theme is up and down chop, i.e. swings, that will eventually lead to resumption of or negation of trend.  oh, and the media are busy manufacturing reasons as usual]
  • Martin  –Josh Brown  [biiwii comment: 3 simple quotes; read them]

 

Around the Web

 

Deflation Calamity Howlers Are Dead Wrong

Guest Post by David Stockman & Stealthflation

The Deflation Calamity Howlers Are Dead Wrong—-In Europe And Everywhere Else

The calamity howlers of deflation are out in force this morning owing to an absolute economic non sequitur. Namely, that year-on-year consumer prices in the EU came in at negative 0.2% in December, implying that ECB printing presses need to go into immediate overdrive.

Well, of course the CPI has momentarily weakened. Crude oil has experienced a monumental plunge of more than 50% since mid-2014. That has temporarily dragged down the euro zone’s reported CPI and the math isn’t all that complex. During the last 12 months,  euro zone energy prices have fallen by 6.3%, and everything else is still 0.6% higher than a year ago.

So what’s the emergency? This is the very same CPI blip that occurred when oil collapsed in the second half of 2008. As is evident below, that episode did not generate some cascading plunge into economic darkness. In fact, the Eurozone CPI was back running above 2.5% in no time.

quick view chart

The truth of the matter is that the EU-19 is in clover because it’s consumers get a big break; and, on the other side of the economic equation, it produces almost no oil. Europe’s production is mainly in the UK and Norway and they have their own currencies. Accordingly, the ECB should be putting its printing presses on an extended sabbatical and declaring victory on the achievement of its “price stability” objective.

Continue reading Deflation Calamity Howlers Are Dead Wrong

Call Off the Deflation Warning

Guest Post by Michael Ashton

Today’s column is a brief one, as I need to post a correction. Not a correction to my stuff, mind you, but to others.

Pictures like the below have been circulating now for a couple of weeks. This is a chart of the 2-year inflation “breakeven” on Bloomberg, illustrating how a “deflation warning” is sounding as they go negative.

bad2y

Continue reading Call Off the Deflation Warning