Tag Archives: inflation

Around the Web

[edit]  Let’s add a new post at NFTRH.com… Semi Equipment Book-to-Bill Ratio Moderating.

  • NFTRH Dovetails some public content (Stocks vs. CPI and vs. Gold) with some of what this weeks report discussed regarding a potential plan for stocks.
  • Josh Brown on how unfairly Jim Cramer was treated by Jon Stewart during the financial crisis.  Well Josh, I had to laugh at this bit… “Had Cramer pushed back and brought up his vigorously alerting the Federal Reserve to the markets’ problems in advance, it would have been entirely justified.”  I remember the screaming monkey show by a guy who became a made-for-TV alarmist after touting touting and touting stocks some more right into and through the top.  Spare me.  I have however, also been a Daily Show fan from day 1; going all the way back to Craig Kilborn.

 

Draghi Speaks the Truth

Draghi Speaks the Truth; ECB Will ‘Do What it Must’

Words are important.  This is not just a headline, it is a reality…

Draghi says ECB will ‘do what it must’ on asset buying to lift inflation

Not ‘do what it thinks would be the best course for the European economy’, not ‘choose the path of least resistance in guiding the financial system to recovery’… the ECB will DO WHAT IT MUST.

As I have written til I’m blue in the face for the last 10 years, we are in the age of ‘Inflation onDemand‘©, 24/7 and 365.  “…do what it must”… let that sink in for a moment.

Japan is trying to kill the Yen, China is dropping interest rates and the world over we have a rolling inflationary operation that is little more than a game of Whack-a-Mole.  BoJ popped up a couple weeks ago and now this one…

draghi
Source: MarketWatch

US Situation

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Post-CPI Tweets

Guest Post by Michael Ashton

Below is a summary of my post-CPI tweets. You can follow me @inflation_guy.

  • CPI +0.0%, +0.2% on core. Above expectations.
  • Core 0.203% before the rounding to 1 decimal place. So this didn’t “round up” to 0.2%. Y/y core at 1.82%, versus 1.7% expectations.
  • Today’s winners include Treasury, who is auctioning a mess of TIPS later.
  • Today’s losers include everyone shorting infl expectations last few months. Keep in mind median CPI > 2.2% so this is not THAT shocking.
  • Core services +2.5%, core goods -0.2%. Both higher (y/y basis) than last month.
  • Fed will be considered a “winner” here since y/y core moves back toward tgt. But in fact losers b/c median already near tgt & rising.
  • Accel major groups: Housing, Apparel, Medical, Recreation, Other. Decel: Transp, Educ/Communication. Unch: Food/Bev.
  • ex motor fuel, Transportation went from 0.6% y/y to 0.7% y/y.
  • Housing: primary rents 3.34% from 3.29%. OER 2.72% from 2.71%. Lodging away from home was big mover at 8.4% from 5.0% (but small weight).
  • Within medical care, medicinal drugs decelerated from 3.08% to 2.77%; but hospital & related svcs rose to 3.91% from 3.47%.
  • Core CPI ex-housing still rose, from 0.88% (a ten-year low) to 0.95%.
  • Primary rents to us look like they should still be accelerating, and are behind pace a bit.
  • Really, nothing soothing at all about this CPI print, unless you were hoping to get inflation “back to target.”
  • Pretty feeble response in inflation markets to upside CPI surprise, but that’s likely because of the looming auction.

After several months of below-trend and below-expectations prints in core inflation, core inflation got back on track today. I must admit that I was beginning to get a big concerned given the multiple months of downside surprise (especially in September, when August’s core inflation figure printed 0.0%), but the solidity of Median CPI has always suggested that we should be getting close to 0.2% prints every month and so a catch-up was due.

It is also possible that median inflation could converge downward to core inflation, but quantitatively we would only expect that if the reasons for core inflation’s decline were that categories which tend to lead were heading lower. In this case, that wasn’t what was happening: most of what was happening to core inflation was self-inflicted, caused by sequester effects that pushed down medical care. So it was always more likely that core inflation would begin to converge higher than the other way around.

Some Fed speakers have recently been voicing concern about the possibility of an unwelcome decline in inflation from these levels. I am flummoxed about those remarks – surely, Federal Reserve economists are aware of median inflation and understand that there is absolutely no evidence that prices broadly are increasing more slowly than they were last year. No evidence whatsoever. But perhaps I should not malign Fed economists when the speakers may have other agendas – for example, the desire to keep interest rates as low as possible lest asset markets correct and cause a messy situation, and therefore to find reasons to ignore any signs that inflation is already at or near their target with upwards momentum.

Our forecast for median inflation has been slowly declining since the beginning of the year, when we expected something from 2.8%-3.4%. As of September, our forecast was 2.5%-2.8%. Median CPI today rose 0.21%, pushing the y/y figure to 2.29%. That’s the highest level since the crisis, just beating out the high from earlier this year and probably signaling a further increase. Our September forecast will not be far wrong.

coremed

 

Around the Web

  • Crude Oil?  Jeff Saut’s latest note (Nov. 17)

 

Why Japan’s Money Printing Madness Matters

Guest Post by David Stockman via Stealthflation

This is getting hard to believe. The announcement that Japan has plunged into a triple dip recession should have been lights out for Abenomics. But, no, its madman prime minister has now called a snap election to enlist more public support for his campaign to destroy what remains of Japan’s economy.

And what’s worse, he’s not likely to be stopped by the electorate or even the leadership of Japan Inc, which presumably should know better. Here’s what Japan leading brokerage had to say about the “unexpected” 1.6% drop in Q3 GDP—- compared to the consensus expectation of a 2.2% gain and after the upward revised shrinkage of 7.3% in Q2.

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Myth #9: Inflation Makes Gold and Silver Go Up

Guest Post by EWI

Don’t Get Ruined by These 10 Popular Investment Myths (Part IX)

Interest rates, oil prices, earnings, GDP, wars, peace, terrorism, inflation, monetary policy, etc. — NONE have a reliable effect on the stock market

You may remember that after the 2008-2009 crash, many called into question traditional economic models. Why did they fail?

And more importantly, will they warn us of a new approaching doomsday, should there be one?

This series gives you a well-researched answer. Here is Part IX; come back soon for Part X.


Myth #9: Inflation makes gold and silver go up.

By Robert Prechter (excerpted from the monthly Elliott Wave Theorist; published since 1979)

This one seems like a no-brainer. The government or the central bank prints more bonds, notes and bills, and prices for things go up in response. Gold is real money, so it must fluctuate along with the inflation rate.

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Gold, Inflation Expectations and Economic Confidence

Guest Post by Steve Saville

As a result of what happened during just one of the past twenty decades (the 1970s), most people now believe that a large rise in “price inflation” or inflation expectations is needed to bring about a major rally in the gold price. This impression of gold is so ingrained that it has persisted even though the US$ gold price managed to rise by 560% during 2001-2011 in parallel with only small increases in “price inflation” (based on the CPI) and inflation expectations. The reality is that gold tends to perform very well during periods of declining confidence in the financial system, the economy and/or the official money, regardless of whether the decline in confidence is based on expectations of higher “inflation” or something else entirely.

Inflation expectations are certainly part of the gold story, but only to the extent that they affect the real interest rate. For example, a 2% rise in inflation expectations would only result in a more bullish backdrop for gold if it were accompanied by a rise of less than 2% in the nominal interest rate. For another example, a 1% decline in inflation expectations would not result in a more bearish backdrop for gold if it were accompanied by a decline of more than 1% in the nominal interest rate.

Other parts of the gold story include indicators of economic confidence and financial-market liquidity, such as credit spreads and the yield curve.

That large rises in the gold price are NOT primarily driven by increasing fear of “inflation” is evidenced by the fact that the large multi-year gold rallies of 2001-2006 and 2008-2011 began amidst FALLING inflation expectations. These rallies were set in motion by substantial stock market declines and plummeting confidence in central banks, commercial banks and the economy’s prospects. Even during the 1970s, the period when the gold price famously rocketed upward in parallel with increasing fear of “inflation”, the gold rally was mostly about declining real interest rates and declining confidence in both monetary and fiscal governance. After all, if the official plan to address a “price inflation” problem involves fixing prices and distributing “Whip Inflation Now” buttons, and at the same time the central bank and the government are experimenting with Keynesian demand-boosting strategies, then there’s only one way for economic confidence to go, and that’s down.

Since mid-2013 there have been a few multi-month periods when it appeared as if economic confidence was turning down, but on each occasion the downturn wasn’t sustained. This is due in no small part to the seemingly unstoppable advance in the stock market. In the minds of many people the stock market and the economy are linked, with a rising stock market supposedly being a sign of future economic strength. This line of thinking is misguided, but regardless of whether it is right or wrong the perception is having a substantial effect on the gold market.

For now, the economic confidence engendered to a large extent by the rising stock market is putting irresistible downward pressure on the gold price.

BOJ Jumps the Shark…

Guest Post by David Stockman via Stealthflation

The BOJ Jumps The Monetary Shark—–Now The Machines, Mad Men And Morons Are Raging

This is just plain sick. Hardly a day after the greatest central bank fraudster of all time, Maestro Greenspan, confessed that QE has not helped the main street economy and jobs, the lunatics at the BOJ flat-out jumped the monetary shark. Even then, the madman Kuroda pulled off his incendiary maneuver by a bare 5-4 vote. Apparently the dissenters——Messrs. Morimoto, Ishida, Sato and Kiuchi—-are only semi-mad.

Never mind that the BOJ will now escalate its bond purchase rate to $750 billion per year—-a figure so astonishingly large that it would amount to nearly $3 trillion per year if applied to a US scale GDP. And that comes on top of a central bank balance sheet which had previously exploded to nearly 50% of Japan’s national income or more than double the already mind-boggling US ratio of 25%.

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The Great Inflation Lie

Guest Post by Bill Bonner

That we live in an age of man-made wonders is beyond dispute. Painless root canals. Tinder. Central bank price controls.

We were traveling hard over the last couple weeks. Somewhere along the way we picked up a cold, which dogged us from Vermont to Maryland’s Eastern Shore. But the security X-ray at Nashville International Airport seemed to finally knock it out.

Global stocks have lost more than $3 trillion of their value so far this month. But the authorities rushed to the rescue like a surgeon taking out a ruptured gallbladder.

As St. Louis Fed president James Bullard told Bloomberg TV (reprinted from yesterday’s Diary):

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NFTRH; USD & Gold Mining Funda’s

As crude oil continues down today we are presented with a perfect opportunity to review why gold mining fundamentals can IMPROVE in a rising US dollar atmosphere.  So many people run the equation through their heads:  USD Strong = Run Away!

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“It’s Inflation All the Way, Baby!”

The title’s quote is one of many eminently quotable messages I had the pleasure of receiving over a few years of contact with a late, great and a very interesting man* named Jonathan Auerbach, who headed a unique specialty (emerging and frontier markets) brokerage in NYC called Auerbach Grayson.

kabukiJon was an honest and ethical man.  He was also a gold bug (in that descriptor’s highest form) who innately understood the Kabuki Dance that has been ongoing by monetary authorities since the ‘Age of Inflation onDemand‘ (what guest poster Bruno de Landevoisin calls the Monetized New Millenium) started its most intense and bald faced phase in 2000.

Yesterday the minutes were released from the last (FOMC) meeting of official interest rate manipulators and surprise surprise, they are found to be hand wringing about the strong dollar.  A strong dollar is going to take direct aim at US manufacturing among other exporting businesses, after all.

“Over the intermeeting period, the foreign exchange value of the dollar had appreciated, particularly against the euro, the yen, and the pound sterling. Some participants expressed concern that the persistent shortfall of economic growth and inflation in the euro area could lead to a further appreciation of the dollar and have adverse effects on the U.S. external sector.”

And the money line…

“At the same time, a couple of participants pointed out that the appreciation of the dollar might also tend to slow the gradual increase in inflation toward the FOMC’s 2 percent goal.”

In an inflated construct (cue the chart for what seems like the 1000th time), there is no way out other than inflation “all the way”.

sp500

So while we twittle our charts and manage markets in the here and now as if we are conventional market participants, we (well I, anyway) are anything but that.  What I do is have some fun along the way with graphical representations of the falseness that is the underpinning of the Age of Inflation onDemand; and the humor too.  Every time the Fed rolls over on making real and sound policy and/or speaks out of both sides of its mouth the reaction is either comical or sad, depending on how you look at it.  I choose both, it’s comical and sad…

outerlimits

“There is nothing wrong with your television set. Do not attempt to adjust the picture. We are controlling transmission. If we wish to make it louder, we will bring up the volume. If we wish to make it softer, we will tune it to a whisper. We will control the horizontal. We will control the vertical. We can roll the image, make it flutter. We can change the focus to a soft blur or sharpen it to crystal clarity. For the next hour, sit quietly and we will control all that you see and hear. We repeat: there is nothing wrong with your television set. You are about to participate in a great adventure…”

Nothing has changed since 2000, when Alan Greenspan began this most adventurous experiment in inflation.  What we have had are boom and bust cycles.  The current cycle has simply emboldened the worst kind of trend followers and touts in an ‘In Greenspan err, Bernanke, err… Yellen we trust!’ continuum of greed and ignorance.  Today, the worst of us hold sway in promoting fantasies that newer and more gullible arrivals on the financial scene will pay for one day.

The FOMC minutes released yesterday prove that they are trying to inflate, they want inflation and that in this “monetized new millennium” it is asset appreciation above all else; especially above the saving that a chronically strong dollar would promote among the population.  Saving after all, is necessary for real and sustainable economic cycles.

aliceThat is not what we have going here.  What we have here is a one-way ticket to the Outer Limits or Wonderland or (pick a popular culture reference)…

* Among other things, Jon was pals with New York Dolls guitarist Johnny Thunders, attended a Mets game with Iggy Pop, was involved in the 1960’s NYC film and arts scene and even advised President Clinton on economic issues.  “Did he take your advice?” asked I.  “Ha ha ha… no” said Jon.  Like I said… interesting.  He was also NFTRH’s very first subscriber, a fact that to this day keeps me trying to live up to his standards.