Post-CPI Summary

By Michael Ashton

Below is a summary of my post-CPI tweets.

I usually post these the day of CPI but I was traveling and didn’t get to do so. These were my tweets in the immediate aftermath of the CPI report.

  • About 15 minutes to CPI. Today’s stream-of-consciousness will be a little more relaxed since I’m at a conference in Florida at the moment!
  • As for the number today, here are some thoughts.
  • We’ve recently begun to see some reduction in pressure from truckload rates upstream. Not down, but rising more slowly. Bottlenecks in overland are easing somewhat. Higher prices are still passing through but less alarm about it.
  • Housing price increases have also been slowing. Again, we’re talking second-derivative stuff; they aren’t falling nationwide. Rents are loosely related to prices, so I don’t think we’ll see much downward pressure there yet, but it’s a meme at the moment.

Continue reading Post-CPI Summary

Ride ’em Cowboy

By Michael Ashton

One disease that afflicts writers of financial commentary…actually, probably commentators in all fields come to think of it…is that when the landscape gets in a ‘rut’ so does our writing. Eventually, if nothing changes about the economy or the market landscape, there isn’t much left to say and thus we (and I really mean “I”) are left repeating ourselves. For those of us who – despite all efforts – aren’t paid for our work, it means that sometimes the right thing to do is to just shut up.

And so that’s what I have done over the last year. As the equity market melted up in somnambulant sameness, as the economy chugged along without major crises or roadblocks…or, anyway, no change in those roadblocks…I wrote less and less. To be sure, part of that was because business was picking up, and this remains an impediment to me writing as frequently as I used to, but much of the reason I didn’t write so much was that not much was changing. There just aren’t many ways you can keep saying “stocks are too expensive, commodities are too cheap, interest rates aren’t at neutral levels, the Fed is screwing up, inflation markets are too low and inflation is rising,” so I took the time to work on other important things.

Continue reading Ride ’em Cowboy

The Men Who Stare at Charts: Decades of Disinflation & 7 Years Post-Op Twist

By NFTRH

I was going to look around to see if I could find a media article out there (complete with a TA trying to sound really important) that would be appropriate to be made fun of in our little Men Who Stare at Charts series. But then I decided to create my own chart, stare at it a little, post it and talk about it (hopefully not too self-importantly).

Introducing an all too busy long-term (monthly) view of the Gold/Silver ratio, along with some key nominal markets.

The Continuum in the lower panel symbolizes the deflationary backbone that has been in place for decades. I maintain that this is a firm marker against which the Fed inflates money supplies, manipulates bonds and by extension manipulates inflation signals. We have been on a theme that like Jerome Powell or hate him, he knows exactly what he is doing because to do otherwise (promote ongoing bubbles on top of bubbles) would in essence end the Fed’s racket, as symbolized by a real breakout in long-term yields.

Continue reading The Men Who Stare at Charts: Decades of Disinflation & 7 Years Post-Op Twist

The Perils of Inflationism

By Doug Noland

December 13 – Financial Times (Chris Giles and Claire Jones): “When the European Central Bank switches off its money-printing press at the turn of this year and stops buying fresh assets, it will mark the end of a decade-long global experiment in how to stave off economic meltdowns. Quantitative easing, the policy that aims to boost spending and inflation by creating electronic money and pumping it into the economy by buying assets such as government bonds, is on the verge of becoming quantitative tightening. With the Federal Reserve slowly reducing its stocks of Treasuries, central banks are no longer in the buying business. Globally, only the Bank of Japan is left as a leading central bank that has not formally called time on expanding its stock of asset purchases. Arguments over how, or even if, the trillions spent by policymakers helped the global economy recover will rage for years to come. But as central banks step back, the initial view is that the purchases worked — whether through encouraging investors to hold more risky assets, easing constraints on borrowing, providing finance so governments could run larger budget deficits or just showing that central banks still had an answer to weak demand and low inflation.”

Continue reading The Perils of Inflationism

Post-CPI Summary

By Michael Ashton

Below is a summary of my post-CPI tweets.

  • Been a while since I did a live CPI dive here. Thanks to all of those who voted with their dollars over the last year and supported my private CPI tweets. It wasn’t enough to make a commitment to it, so I’m back to occasionally doing it free on this channel. Hope it helps.
  • I do it anyway for myself and Enduring Investments, so it’s not THAT big a deal to put it here if I happen to be in the mood. Anyway, hope you get some value. If so, think about whether I or Enduring can help your investment processes. Now for the walk-up.
  • Consensus calls for about 0.18% on core CPI today, with the y/y rising to 2.2%. The bouncy PPI helps the mood although the PPI itself doesn’t have much forecasting power for CPI.
  • in PPI there were clear freight and other upstream pressures though. We haven’t really seen much of this in CPI – no real trade/tariff effect yet e.g. Apparel is where I’d expect to see than and in core goods generally. But they’re still slightly in deflation.
  • I think there’s some upward risk to used cars and trucks, but there was a big jump last month so we could get a retracement of that before another move higher next month, or continue the ‘catch up’ to private surveys this month. Hard to tell on a month-to-month basis.
  • Lodging Away from Home took a dip last month and might be upside risk today. Medical Care is due to start rising again too. So in a minute, we will see!
  • Slightly stronger core than expected…0.21% when they were looking for 0.18%. But pretty close.

Continue reading Post-CPI Summary

Inflation, Report

By Keith Weiner

What is inflation?

Any layman can tell you—and nearly everyone uses it this way in informal speech—that inflation is rising prices. Some will say “due to devaluation of the money.”

Economists will say, no it’s not rising prices per se. That is everywhere and always the effect. The cause, the inflation as such, is an increase in the quantity of money. Which is the same thing as saying devaluation. It is assumed that each unit of money commands a pro rata share of all the goods produced, so if there are more units then that means each unit is worth less. Value = 1 / N (where N is the number of units outstanding).

There are different ways that the quantity of money can expand. It depends on what kind of monetary system you have. For example, the miners increase the quantity of gold. In free banking, the banks increase the quantity of gold-redeemable notes. In our irredeemable monetary system, the Fed increases the quantity of dollars.

Continue reading Inflation, Report

Pivotal Events

By Bob Hoye

Click for PDF…

Support 100% ad-free Biiwii.com by making a donation of your choice!

Or better yet, subscribe to NFTRH Premium for an in-depth weekly market report, interim updates and NFTRH+ chart and trade ideas to get even more bang for your buck. You can also keep up to date with plenty of actionable public content at NFTRH.com by using the email form on the right sidebar. Or follow via Twitter @BiiwiiNFTRH, StockTwits or RSS. Also check out the quality market writers at Biiwii.com.

The Google Machine Inspires a Discussion about Inflation and Deflation

By NFTRH

The following is excerpted from the Opening Notes segment in this week’s edition of Notes From the Rabbit Hole, NFTRH 525 (out on Sunday, November 11). It pretty much came out of nowhere after I did a comparison of Google searches for “inflation” and “deflation” while checking Google Trends for another aspect of the report.

The Google Machine Inspires a Discussion about Inflation & Deflation

Switching gears, while I was in the Google machine I decided to compare two terms that are at the heart of our investment management going forward; Inflation and Deflation.

inflation and deflation

It is no surprise that inflation is always much more often searched for because well, they are inflating in one form or another constantly. Whether it is through outrageously experimental monetary policy under the Bernanke Fed or supposedly sound fiscal policy under the Trump administration, it is all designed to raise prices and enrich asset owners, while leveraging debt (which is where the potential for deflation comes in).

Continue reading The Google Machine Inspires a Discussion about Inflation and Deflation

The Ultimate Financial Crisis Will Be Inflationary

By Steve Saville

I’ve read many comments to the effect that the next financial crisis will be like 2007-2008, only worse. However, the sole reason that many people are talking about a coming 2008-like crisis is because the happenings of 2008 are still fresh in the memory. Market participants often expect the next crisis to look like the last one, but it never does. Consequently, the general prediction about the next financial crisis with the highest probability of success is that it won’t be anything like 2008. It could, for example, revolve around an inflation scare rather than a deflation scare. In fact, the current monetary system’s ultimate financial crisis, meaning the crisis that leads to a new monetary system, will have to be inflationary.

The ultimate financial crisis will have to be inflationary, because deflation scares provide ‘justification’ for central bank money-pumping and thus enable the long-term credit expansion to continue with only minor interruptions. To put it another way, a crisis won’t be system-threatening as long as it can be ameliorated by central banks doing what they do best, which is promote inflation.

A related point is that a crisis won’t be system-threatening as long as it involves an increase in demand for the official money. The 2007-2008 crisis was such an animal. Like every other crisis in the US since 1940 it did not involve genuine deflation, almost regardless of how the word deflation is defined. The money supply continued to grow, the total supply of credit did no worse than flatten out, and, as illustrated by the following long-term chart, there was nothing more than a downward blip in the Consumer Price Index. However, with the stock market losing more than half its value and commodity prices collapsing, for 6-12 months it sure felt like deflation was happening.

CPI_LT_151018
Chart source: dshort

Continue reading The Ultimate Financial Crisis Will Be Inflationary

Post-CPI Summary

By Michael Ashton

Below is a summary of my post-CPI tweets.

  • Only 20 minutes to CPI!
  • This month, we are looking for something of a correction to last month’s terribly weak and surprising core CPI (0.08% m/m).
  • Recall that last month, Apparel plunged -1.6% m/m – which seems at odds with a world of higher landed costs due to tariffs.
  • The only way that would make sense is if BLS were backing out the tariffs from the retail prices, but this isn’t like sales tax – no good way to disentangle tariffs since some products have ’em and some don’t.
  • So Apparel prices are due for a bounce. That’s well-understood out there in inflation land I think.
  • The apparel plunge was the driving force pushing core goods to -0.2% y/y when it had gotten all the way up to 0.0% y/y the prior month. It’s hard to get a lot of inflation without core goods being positive!
  • Other parts of core goods remain perky, such as Used Cars and Trucks. Probably some further gains due there.
  • The core services component was also soft last month, as OER softened slightly (but it has a big weight) and medical care declined.
  • I’m starting to get less confident that Medical Care will have a big upswing because of work I’m doing in pharma inflation. But at the same time, the y/y looks like it may have fallen too far too fast. And I don’t think doctors’ services +0.8% y/y makes a lot of sense.
  • All in all, the odds I think favor a solid 0.2% or above. This would cause y/y core to reaccelerate from 2.19% back to the 2.3% range b/c we’re dropping off an 0.13% from last Sept. To get a 2.4% print on core, we’d need 0.29% or better m/m, which is a stretch.
  • …but not out of the question if last month’s surprises are totally reversed.
  • The bottom line I am really watching is core-ex-shelter, which has been rising and is the key to the next leg higher in inflation. Housing won’t carry the water.
  • We’re down to about 12 minutes here before the number and one thing I want to add: more than recent CPIs this is likely a pretty important number for the stock market. Climbing CPI –> higher rates;stocks aren’t handling that well right now. A soft CPI is really good for stocks.

Continue reading Post-CPI Summary

Update and Summary on Housing Inflation

By Michael Ashton

It’s inflation week, and so an excellent time to sign up to follow my live CPI tweets on my “premium” channel by signing up at PremoSocial. Membership also gets you access to my daily and weekly chart packages, to which I tweet a link daily on that channel. (Consider it – for only $10/month!)

It’s worth turning for a bit to look at the housing market. Shelter is a large part of what consumers spend money on, and therefore a large part of the CPI. It also happens that primary rents (if you rent your dwelling) and “Owners’ Equivalent Rent” or OER tend to be some of the slowest-moving pieces of the CPI. I’ve said many times that if you can get the direction of OER right, it’s very hard to be extremely wrong on the direction of core inflation.

Recently, there’s been some softening in home sales, and so in some quarters there has been an alarm raised that OER is about to start softening and therefore core inflation has peaked. My purpose in this article is to examine that evidence with an eye that is a bit more studied on these matters.

Continue reading Update and Summary on Housing Inflation

Inflation-Related Impressions From Recent Events

By Michael Ashton

It has been a long time since I’ve posted, and in the meantime the topics to cover have been stacking up. My lack of writing has certainly not been for lack of topics but rather for a lack of time. So: heartfelt apologies that this article will feel a lot like a brain dump.

A lot of what I want to write about today was provoked/involves last week. But one item I wanted to quickly point out is more stale than that and yet worth pointing out. It seems astounding, but in early August Japan’s Ministry of Health, Labour, and Welfare reported the largest nominal wage increase in 1997. (See chart, source Bloomberg). This month there was a correction, but the trend does appear firmly upward. This is a good point for me to add the reminder that wages tend to follow inflation rather than lead it. But I believe Japanese JGBis are a tremendous long-tail opportunity, priced with almost no inflation implied in the price…but if there is any developed country with a potential long-tail inflation outcome that’s possible, it is Japan. I think, in fact, that if you asked me to pick one developed country that would be the first to have “uncomfortable” levels of inflation, it would be Japan. So dramatically out-of-consensus numbers like these wage figures ought to be filed away mentally.

Continue reading Inflation-Related Impressions From Recent Events